Our Mission

Rooted theater company engages, challenges and inspires audiences through theatrical productions that range from the classics to new and emerging works; our programming encourages social consciousness through Real, Open, and Objective Theater Education. We celebrate the diversity of our community's roots, our present struggles and future successes through intentional theater.


OUR VISION

Rooted is dedicated to producing socially relevant theater based on community experiences.


our Achievements

  • reintroduced the theatrical arts to a community with limited access  

  • engaged more than 2500 community members within 5 yeARS

  • Built partnerships with community leaders & stakeholders

  • Crafted programming directly influenced by the community

  • Reinvigorated a passion for theater in east new york, brooklyn


Our Founder and Artistic Director, Kareem Nemley speaks to filmmaker Sara Sekine about our inaugural production "A Lesson Before Dying," Rooted's mission and work.


Our Neighborhood - East New York, Brooklyn

East New York is a neighborhood in the easternmost section of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community District 5, covered by Brooklyn Community Board 5.  

Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: Cypress Hills Cemetery to the north, the Borough of Queens to the east, Jamaica Bay to the south, and the Bay Ridge Branch railway tracks next to Van Sinderen Avenue to the west. Linden Boulevard and Atlantic Avenue are the primary thoroughfares through East New York. Its ZIP Codes include 11207, 11208, and 11239. The area is patrolled by the 75th Precinct. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 2.

During the latter part of the twentieth century, East New York came to be predominantly inhabited by African Americans and Latinos.

in 2013 the African Burial Ground Square was designated after remains were found between New Lots and Livonia Avenues from Barbey to Schenck Streets. It shares space with the New Lots branch of the Brooklyn Public Library. After months of community based efforts the burial ground was confirmed and formally recognized.

 

our legacy - The Gotham Theater

 Located on the south side of Fulton, off the corner of Alabama, in the area we now refer to as "Broadway Junction." The first cornerstone on the building which would be known as Gotham Theater is laid in November 1889.   Initially the building was William Bennett's Casino. it would later be known as  the Brooklyn Music Hall and after extensive repairs it opens in February of 1896. At this point it is owned by Otto Huber and is considered a vaudeville house.   later it would becomes the Gotham Hotel and even later The Brooklyn Music Hall; in 1901 it becomes the Gotham Theater. the theater is meant to cater more to families.  In 1907 Mae West performs there as a child actor in Hal Clarendon's Stock Theater company. The Gotham switched to silent movies in the 1920s, closed in 1930, and made one attempt to reopen in 1932. The theater closed in 1934.  an article from November 22, 1935 the Brooklyn Eagle pinpoints its demolition.

Located on the south side of Fulton, off the corner of Alabama, in the area we now refer to as "Broadway Junction." The first cornerstone on the building which would be known as Gotham Theater is laid in November 1889. 

Initially the building was William Bennett's Casino. it would later be known as  the Brooklyn Music Hall and after extensive repairs it opens in February of 1896. At this point it is owned by Otto Huber and is considered a vaudeville house. 

later it would becomes the Gotham Hotel and even later The Brooklyn Music Hall; in 1901 it becomes the Gotham Theater. the theater is meant to cater more to families.

In 1907 Mae West performs there as a child actor in Hal Clarendon's Stock Theater company. The Gotham switched to silent movies in the 1920s, closed in 1930, and made one attempt to reopen in 1932. The theater closed in 1934.

an article from November 22, 1935 the Brooklyn Eagle pinpoints its demolition.